Andreas of Pussy Goes Grrr – Critical Juncture

Thursday, August 26, 2010 at 1:09 pm

Our Critical Juncture guest this week is Andreas. He’s one-half of Pussy Goes Grrr, a website that promises to offer “rogue thoughts about culture, society, and sexuality.” It appears that his partner in crime must cover most of the sex stuff, as a look at recent posts from Andreas show nothing but articles on cinema (which is a very good thing). There’s a tribute to anime legend Satoshi Kon, reviews of I Am Love and Winter’s Bone, and a collection of groovy pics from Danger: Diabolik.

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Want to know more? Here’s a little something about Andreas from the Pussy Goes Grrr website:

“Andreas was born inside the Arctic Circle. He’s currently studying to receive a BA in Cinema and Media Studies. In his spare time, he likes to consume sugary foods, read depressing graphic novels, and find new ways to frighten himself. His blogging interests include film (especially foreign, animated, cult, horror, etc.), ’90s TV, and the role of gender in art.”

OGM: What’s the first movie that you remember seeing?
Andreas: My father exposed me to a lot of foreign art films, so I recall seeing Aguirre, the Wrath of God and The Tin Drum very early in my childhood. But I’ve been told that the first movie I saw in a theater was Michael Mann’s The Last of the Mohicans.

OGM: What’s the most recent movie you’ve seen?
Andreas: House of the Devil (2009).

OGM: Is there a particular film that you feel is criminally underrated?
Andreas: As with most of the questions here, this could have dozens of answers, but I’ll say that Powell & Pressburger’s The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943) doesn’t get half the attention it deserves. I’ve heard it described as the British Citizen Kane, and I’d say that approximates its significance in film history. (David Mamet loves it, too.)

OGM: Which director do you feel has turned out the best overall body of work?
Andreas: It’d be silly to describe any one director’s body of work as “the best”…but for the question’s sake, I’ll say that Billy Wilder’s output was as high-quality, diverse, and entertaining as anyone else’s. Howard Hawks, too.

OGM: From an artistic standpoint, which film do you think is most important?
Andreas: One very artistically important movie is Tokyo Story (1953), since it’s the culmination of Ozu’s graceful, quietly powerful visual style, though I don’t think I’d call one movie “the most important.”

OGM: All artsy considerations aside, which movie is your personal favorite?
Andreas: My catalog of favorite films is based partially on “artsy considerations,” so I’ll submit Carol Reed’s The Third Man (1949), which is a near-perfect work of noir artistry and a poignant rumination on intimate relationships in a postwar world.

OGM: In your opinion, which film is entirely overrated?
Andreas: Many spectacular-but-mediocre movies tend to be greatly overrated; one example is Ben-Hur (1959), which is extraordinarily long and pretty hollow.

OGM: Have you ever walked out of the theatre during a film? If so, what movie was playing?
Andreas: This doesn’t really count, but I did walk into and then immediately out of a screening of You Don’t Mess with the Zohan. I still want those few seconds of my life back. For the most part, though, I’ll stick with a movie to the very end.

OGM: In your mind, what’s the ultimate goal of a movie critic?
Andreas: I don’t know about an “ultimate goal,” but as a critic, I just want to apply my personal skills of critical analysis to honestly appraising the quality of movies, and help steer film culture and viewing audiences in positive directions.

OGM: Time to look into the future. Do you predict any major changes for the movie industry over the next 25 years?
Andreas: I’m not an industry expert by any means, but looking into my Magic 8-Ball, I foresee more of the same. Heaps of trash, some gems.

OGM: Here’s another chance to predict the future. Name a relatively unknown actor or actress who’ll be a huge star within five years.
Andreas: The actors/actresses I like never seem to become big stars. So I shall decline to answer.

OGM: Who’s your favorite movie critic to read?
Andreas: I read a lot of critics; I’d say my favorites are Ebert, Anthony Lane, David Thomson, Kim Newman, the A.V. Club crew, Jonathan Rosenbaum, Pauline Kael’s classics, and Armond White when I’m looking for a laugh.

Thanks again to Andreas from Pussy Goes Grrr for taking part in this week’s Critical Juncture segment. Be sure to visit the site to show your appreciation, and join us again next week when I’ll be talking to yet another film critic or movie blogger. Until then, here are a few interviews from the past to keep you entertained:

This entry was posted on Thursday, August 26th, 2010 at 1:09 pm and is filed under Movie Critic Interviews. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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